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Salvador Dalí Die-Cut Note Card with Stickers

Salvador Dalí Die-Cut Note Card with Stickers

By The Unemployed Philosopher's Guild

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The great surrealist, flat and made out of paper. What could be more surreal than that? A die-cut notecard that comes with an envelope and sheet of stickers with quotes from Dali as well as traditional messages like "Happy Birthday" and "Happy Anniversary."

Explore related artwork by Salvador Dalí at the Chrysler Museum

Product Details

  • Includes envelope and sticker sheet
  • Product type: Blank Note Card
  • Shipping Dimensions: 8.75 × 4.0
    (22.2 × 10.2 cm)
  • Shipping Weight: 0.13 lb (2.0 oz; 57 g)
  • SKU010003176 | UPC: 814229003205

About the Artist, Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí (born May 11, 1904, Figueres, Spain—died January 23, 1989, Figueres) was a Spanish Surrealist painter and printmaker, influential for his explorations of subconscious imagery. Major themes in his work include dreams, the subconscious, sexuality, religion, science and his closest personal relationships. To the dismay of those who held his work in high regard, and to the irritation of his critics, his eccentric and ostentatious public behavior often drew more attention than his artwork.

About The Unemployed Philosopher's Guild

The origins of the Unemployed Philosophers Guild are shrouded in mystery. Some accounts trace the Guild's birth to Athens in the latter half of the 4th century BCE. Allegedly, several lesser philosophers grew weary of the endless Socratic dialogue endemic in their trade and turned to crafting household implements and playthings. (Hence the assertions that Socrates quaffed his hemlock poison from a Guild-designed chalice, though vigorous debate surrounds the question of whether it was a "disappearing" chalice.)

Others argue that the UPG dates from the High Middle Ages, when the Philosophers Guild entered the world of commerce by selling bawdy pamphlets to pilgrims facing long lines for the restroom. Business boomed until 1211 when Pope Innocent III condemned the publications. Not surprisingly, this led to increased sales, even as half our membership was burned at the stake.

More recently, revisionist historians have pinpointed the birth of the Guild to the time it was still cool to live in New York City's Lower East Side. Two brothers turned their inner creativity and love of paying rent towards fulfilling the people's needs for finger puppets, warm slippers, coffee cups, and cracking up at stuff.

Most of the proceeds go to unemployed philosophers (and their associates). A portion also goes to some groups working on profound causes.

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Thank You for your Support

Your purchase supports the mission and programs of the Chrysler Museum of Art (including the Perry Glass Studio, and the Moses Myers House). We couldn't do what we do without you. Thank you.

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