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Frank Lloyd Wright Magnetic Finger Puppet

Frank Lloyd Wright Magnetic Finger Puppet

By The Unemployed Philosopher's Guild

Regular price $8.95 USD
Regular price Sale price $8.95 USD
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Make an architectural statement on your kitchen fridge with this Frank Lloyd Wright Magnetic Finger Puppet! This quirky finger puppet comes with a magnet back, turning any chore into a mini-performance piece. Make a splash with a classic! Comes with an information tag attached, with a mini bio tag of essential dates, key facts, and a quotable quote.

  • Recommended for ages 5 and up due to small parts
  • Information tag included

Product Details

  • Product type: Finger Puppet
  • Shipping Dimensions: 4.0
    (10.2 cm)
  • Shipping Weight: 0.19 lb (3.0 oz; 85 g)
  • SKU010010987 | 814229001478

About the Artist, Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) remains an iconic figure in American architecture and design. Born in Richland Center, Wisconsin, Wright's career spanned over seven decades and left an indelible mark on the world of architecture. He was known for his visionary approach, pioneering organic architecture that seamlessly integrated buildings with their natural surroundings. Wright's most famous works include Fallingwater, a masterpiece of modern architecture built over a waterfall in Pennsylvania, and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, which features a distinctive spiral design. His unique style, characterized by clean lines, open spaces, and innovative use of materials, has influenced countless architects and continues to inspire generations of designers worldwide. Wright's legacy as an architectural genius and his commitment to a harmonious relationship between nature and structures have solidified his place as one of America's most revered architects.

Throughout his career, Wright designed more than 1,000 structures, ranging from private residences and office buildings to places of worship and museums. He believed in creating architecture that responded to its environment and celebrated the spirit of the American landscape. The Prairie style, developed by Wright in the early 20th century, emphasized horizontal lines and open interior spaces, reflecting the vastness of the Midwestern prairie. His contributions to the field of architecture were not limited to design alone; Wright also embraced innovative construction techniques and advocated for the use of locally sourced materials. Beyond his architectural achievements, Wright was a complex personality, often attracting controversy and facing personal and professional challenges. Nevertheless, his lasting impact on the built environment and his influence on subsequent generations of architects have firmly established him as a visionary and celebrated American architect.

About The Unemployed Philosopher's Guild

The origins of the Unemployed Philosophers Guild are shrouded in mystery. Some accounts trace the Guild's birth to Athens in the latter half of the 4th century BCE. Allegedly, several lesser philosophers grew weary of the endless Socratic dialogue endemic in their trade and turned to crafting household implements and playthings. (Hence the assertions that Socrates quaffed his hemlock poison from a Guild-designed chalice, though vigorous debate surrounds the question of whether it was a "disappearing" chalice.)

Others argue that the UPG dates from the High Middle Ages, when the Philosophers Guild entered the world of commerce by selling bawdy pamphlets to pilgrims facing long lines for the restroom. Business boomed until 1211 when Pope Innocent III condemned the publications. Not surprisingly, this led to increased sales, even as half our membership was burned at the stake.

More recently, revisionist historians have pinpointed the birth of the Guild to the time it was still cool to live in New York City's Lower East Side. Two brothers turned their inner creativity and love of paying rent towards fulfilling the people's needs for finger puppets, warm slippers, coffee cups, and cracking up at stuff.

Most of the proceeds go to unemployed philosophers (and their associates). A portion also goes to some groups working on profound causes.

Chrysler Museum Member Discount

Members of the Chrysler Museum receive a 10% discount* everyday when logged in. Use discount code MEMBER10 at checkout.

Not a member? Join today and receive member benefits.

If you've recently joined or renewed, and you don't see your discount reflected at checkout after entering the code, contact us and we'll take care of it right away for you.

*does not include gift cards, clearance merchandise, or Blackwing pencils.

Thank You for your Support

Your purchase supports the mission and programs of the Chrysler Museum of Art (including the Perry Glass Studio, and the Myers House). We couldn't do what we do without you. Thank you.

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