Hilma af Klint, c. 1901 or earlier

About the Artist

Hilma af Klint

Hilma af Klint (1862 — 1944) was a pioneering Swedish artist who made significant contributions to the abstract art movement long before its official inception. She is widely regarded as one of the first artists to explore abstract art, predating famous abstract painters like Wassily Kandinsky and Kazimir Malevich. Inspired by spiritualism, mysticism, and theosophy, af Klint delved into the exploration of spirituality and the unseen realms through her art. Her work often incorporated symbolic and geometric shapes, vibrant colors, and intricate patterns, creating a unique and enigmatic visual language.

Af Klint's most renowned body of work is arguably The Paintings for the Temple, a series of abstract paintings created with the guidance of spiritual entities during seances. This groundbreaking series, completed between 1906 and 1915, is a testament to her visionary and experimental approach to art. However, her abstract works were largely unrecognized during her lifetime, as she kept them private and stipulated that they should not be shown publicly until at least 20 years after her death.

It wasn't until many years later, well into the 20th century, that Hilma af Klint's extraordinary contributions to abstract art were rediscovered and gained the recognition they deserved. Her innovative and spiritually-infused approach to art continues to captivate audiences worldwide, solidifying her position as a visionary artist and an essential figure in the history of abstract art.