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Gordon Parks: Stokely Carmichael and Black Power

Gordon Parks: Stokely Carmichael and Black Power

Artbook | D. A. P.

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Gordon Parks’ 1967 Life magazine essay “Whip of Black Power” is a nuanced profile of the young, controversial civil rights leader Stokely Carmichael. As chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Carmichael gained national attention and inspired media backlash when he issued the call for Black Power in Greenwood, Mississippi, in June 1966. Parks shadowed him from the fall of 1966 to the spring of 1967, as Carmichael gave speeches, headed meetings and promoted the growing Black Power movement. Parks’ photos and writing addressed Carmichael’s intelligence and humor, presenting the whole man behind the headline-making speeches and revealing his own advocacy of Black Power and its message of self-determination and love.

Stokely Carmichael and Black Power delves into Parks’ groundbreaking presentation of Carmichael, with analysis of his images and accompanying text about the charismatic leader. Lisa Volpe explores Parks’ complex understanding of the movement and its leader, and Cedric Johnson frames Black Power within the heightened political moment of the late 1960s. Carmichael’s own voice is represented through a reprint of his important 1966 essay “What We Want.”

  • Hardcover
  • 176 pages, with 83 illustrations
  • 11.4 × 9.8 inches (28.9 × 24.8 cm)
  • Publication date: September 27, 2022

Explore related artwork by Gordon Parks at the Chrysler Museum

Product Details

  • Exhibition Catalog
  • Hardcover
  • 176 pages
  • 83 illustrations
  • Publication date:
  • Height: 11.4 inches (29.0 cm)
  • Width: 9.8 inches (24.9 cm)
  • 3.1 lb (49.6 oz; 1406 g)
  • ISBN: 9783969990940
  • SKU010008032

About the Artist, Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks (1912–2006) was a photographer, filmmaker, musician and author whose 50-year career focused on American culture, social justice, the civil rights movement and the Black American experience. Born into poverty and segregation in Fort Scott, Kansas, Parks was awarded the Julius Rosenwald Fellowship in 1942, which led to a position with the Farm Security Administration. In 1969 he became the first Black American to write and direct a major feature film, The Learning Tree, and his next directorial endeavor, Shaft (1971), helped define a film genre.

About Artbook | D. A. P.

Artbook | D.A.P.

Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. is America’s premier source for books on twentieth and twenty-first century art, photography, design and aesthetic culture. Founded in 1990 in downtown New York at a time when fine and sometimes esoteric international art books had a difficult time making their way into the wider American marketplace, over the past three decades D.A.P. has grown into a major international distributor of books, special editions and rare publications from an array of the world’s most respected publishers, museums and cultural institutions.

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